Rodrigue in Santa Fe, Continued

Until now, it was 35 years ago that George Rodrigue last exhibited in Santa Fe, New Mexico, when his good friend, Rosalea Murphy, hosted an exhibition of his paintings in the apartment above her famous restaurant, The Pink Adobe. George spoke often of the unique camaraderie he enjoyed with artists such as Rosalea, her daughterContinue reading “Rodrigue in Santa Fe, Continued”

Rodrigue Sculpture in Santa Fe

George Rodrigue’s Blue Dog sculptures are amongst his greatest artistic achievements. This month, in the garden of the Acequia Madre House Museum in Santa Fe, we installed George’s first public artwork in New Mexico. The 11-foot sculpture, made of steel, aluminum, and chrome, includes a unique chatoyant effect produced by three distinct shades of automotiveContinue reading “Rodrigue Sculpture in Santa Fe”

Rodrigue on Tour! Film Clips from Florida & Alabama Schools

It was 78 years ago, on March 13, 1944, that my late husband, George Rodrigue, was born to Marie and George, Sr. in New Iberia, Louisiana. After more than twenty years of marriage, they had given up on having children. Yet along came George, who brought magic to their lives, and later, to my life,Continue reading “Rodrigue on Tour! Film Clips from Florida & Alabama Schools”

Priceless Puppies

It was twenty years ago, while halfway joking, that I surprised George Rodrigue with a white porcelain vase produced by artist Jeff Koons of his 3-D artwork, Puppy.  George was unreserved in his criticism of Koons, and yet I also sensed his fascination with the artist who, among other things, fetches millions of dollars forContinue reading “Priceless Puppies”

The Spirit of Giving

Why do we give?  I wonder a bit at the designation, “Giving Tuesday” following Thanksgiving, since every day is an opportunity to give and to better our world!  So, instead of asking for help on behalf of the Life & Legacy Foundation, I am GIVING thanks to those individuals and entities that provided much-needed funding,Continue reading “The Spirit of Giving”

Walk With Me to the Future

It was while bedridden with polio that George Rodrigue (1944-2013) discovered painting. Unable to walk, and highly contagious with a disease feared by parents everywhere, he remained at home throughout much of the third grade with only his mother for company. His father, George, Sr., supported his family from the road while working as aContinue reading “Walk With Me to the Future”

Miss July Fourth at Fifty

“Paintings take on a life of their own, long after the artist is gone.” George Rodrigue, from my journal. As a young Cajun man of twenty-seven living in Lafayette, Louisiana, George Rodrigue (1944-2013) chose to express his culture’s pride in their adopted American homeland in a most unusual way. His painting of Independence Day illustratesContinue reading “Miss July Fourth at Fifty”

Teachers (And Why It Almost Didn’t Happen)

Presenting to teachers presents an unusual challenge.  After all, that is their role with their students during hundreds of classes each year.  Last week, during the Oklahoma A+ Schools “Not Your Average Conference” at the University of Central Oklahoma, teachers from seventy arts-integrated schools laughed at me, or rather with me, when I asked duringContinue reading “Teachers (And Why It Almost Didn’t Happen)”

What’s With This Dog?

George Rodrigue’s Blue Dog artworks became a phenomenon, as well as a portal to creative freedom for the artist.   On his canvas, along with drawings, sculptures, and digital expressions, the surrealist impulses within his Cajun paintings flourished beyond imaginary Louisiana settings to include the broad expanse of George’s mind, unlimited by a culture orContinue reading “What’s With This Dog?”

Bodies

“In Art, the more personal you become, the better you become.” George Rodrigue as I wrote his words in my journal, 6/30/11 Years ago, George’s and my publishing agent, Roz Cole, pushed me to write a book she called, How to Love.*  At the time, I humored her by considering it, but I deferred toContinue reading “Bodies”